UK CAER Current News

The Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) is one of the University of Kentucky's multidisciplinary research centers. Its energy research provides a focal point for environmental, renewable and fossil fuels research in Kentucky.

UK CAER Has a New Doctor in the House!

clock November 11, 2015 13:17 by author Alice

Wilson D. Shafer - now Dr. Will - recently earned his Ph.D degree in Chemistry from the University of Kentucky. His dissertation's title is ... "Investigation in the Competitive Partitioning of Dissociated H2 and D2 on Activated Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts." Dr. Burtron Davis, Associate Director of the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research's Clean Fuels and Chemical research group, served as adviser.

UK CAER FT Catalyst Scientists Conduct Experiments at Canadian Light Source

clock September 21, 2015 15:10 by author Alice
Dr. Gary Jacobs and Dr. Ramana Pendyala from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research's Clean Fuels and Chemicals research group was recently interviewed by Victoria Martinez, the Communications Coordinator at the Canadian Light Source, Inc., in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada while the two scientists were working at the Soft X-ray Microcharacterization Beamline laboratory.
The researchers, in collaboration with Dr. Yongfeng Hu of CLSI, analyzed Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts that had been exposed to common contaminants found in biomass-derived synthesis gas. The soft X-rays allow for an analysis of low energy edges such as sulfur and chlorine, which are common catalyst poisons, as well as potassium, a promoter in iron FT catalysts. Moreover, the beamline is also capable of handling harder X-rays such that iron and cobalt, which are primary FT catalyst metals, can also be characterized.

The XANES technique is used to evaluate electronic properties, while the EXAFS method examines local atomic structure. The project, led by Dr. Burtron H. Davis, UK CAER, and involving his entire team, is focused on utilizing second generation biomass - which does not compete with food production - for the sustainable production of transportation fuels such as diesel and aviation fuels.

More Photos from Canadian Light Source Flicker Account.

UK CAER Catalysis Paper is Journal of Catalysis Featured Article

clock July 23, 2015 17:42 by author Alice
A paper authored by scientists from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research group - Clean Fuels and Chemicals - is a Journal of Catalysis Editor-in-Chief's Feature Article.


Starting this year, the Journal of Catalysis has decided to select one article each week as Featured Article. These articles will be prominently displayed on the Journal’s homepage ( and will be made freely available to the public for 3 months following publication of the respective issue.


The paper entitled, "Fischer–Tropsch synthesis: Effect of ammonia in syngas on the Fischer–Tropsch synthesis performance of a precipitated iron catalyst" has been selected as one of the four Featured Articles from the June 2015 issue.


The authors of the paper include: Wenping Ma, Gary Jacobs, Dennis E. Sparks, Venkat Ramana Rao Pendyala, Shelley G. Hopps, Gerald A. Thomas, Hussein H. Hamdeh, Aimee MacLennan, Yongfeng Hu, Burtron H. Davis. (Citation: Journal of Catlysis, Volume 326, June 2015, Pages 149-160).


UK CAER Publication from Canadian Light Source: From plant matter to jet fuel

clock June 11, 2015 17:40 by author Alice

An article about UK CAER's experts (the handsome fellows in the above picture are (left to right): Dr. Venkat Ramana Rao Pendyala, Senior Research Scientist; Dr. Gary Jacobs, Principal Research Engineer; and Dr. Burtron H. Davis, Assistant Director, all from the Clean Fuels and Chemicals Group located at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research) focus and ability in harnessing synchrotron research to refine the processes used to convert plants to gas to usable liquid was recently featured on the Canadian Light Source website.

The article From plant matter to jet fuel - Streamlining the production of ultraclean fuel discusses how the CAER team uses synchrotron analysis to study the effects of specific impurities on the conversion process to try to identify at what threshold each chemical blocks efficient conversion to usable fuel. Right now, roughly one-third to one-half of the cost to produce syngas for fuel production comes from cleaning out impurities. In the long term, this work could help large companies produce inexpensive, clean, and renewable sources by significantly cutting that cost.

The full article can be read from the Canadian Light Source website. also picked up the article.

UK CAER Collaboration with University of Milan in Italy

clock June 11, 2015 15:22 by author Alice
As part of a collaboration with Professor Carlo Visconti and Professor Luca Lietti from the University of Milan, Italy, UK-CAER’s Clean Fuels and Chemicals Research group, led by Dr. Burtron H. Davis, had the opportunity to host Ms. Michela Martinelli, a PhD graduate student, for several months.


During that time, Ms. Martinelli worked with UK-CAER research staff to investigate methods to improve low temperature water-gas shift catalysts for fuel cell applications. She worked very hard, and one manuscript was accepted for publication in an excellent journal, while a second completed manuscript was submitted as a book chapter.


During her stay at UK-CAER, Ms. Martinelli collaborated not only with our staff, but also with researchers at both Brookhaven National Laboratory, where she had the opportunity to visit and conduct experiments, and Argonne National Laboratory. We are happy to report that Dr. Michela Martinelli successfully defended her PhD thesis in December of 2014.

New Research Funded at UK CAER

clock January 22, 2015 16:28 by author Alice
The University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research has again made funding available to provide seed grant opportunities to CAER researchers to collaborate in exploring new energy-related ideas and to open up new avenues of research. This program, the "brainchild" of Directory Rodney Andrews, was established to bridge the divide between internal creative ideas and large government grants and/or industrial funding, with the objective being to develop a process of converting new research concepts into competitive proposals. The success of this program since its inception is obvious with 3 papers written; 4 proposals written and all 4 proposals funded for a total of nearly $800,00.00 of external funding!     For the second year, the CAER Staff gathered to hear presentations given by 8 different young scientists that received a "seed" grant during 2014.


Leland Widger - Presenter - Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon-Loaded Amine Solutions for CO2 Capture and Utilization (co-authors Cameron Lippert): Much effort in recent research has focused on the direct activation of CO2 by hydrogenation catalysts for reduction by molecular H2 to methanol. However, the direct activation of gaseous CO2 and the subsequent reduction by 3 reducing equivalents is a difficult and energy-intensive transformation. We proposed to combine the advantages of amine-based CCS, the activation of CO2 by aqueous amines, with the utility of reduction catalysts to obtain an accessible and valuable chemical feedstock, formic acid. Hydrogenation by a single reducing equivalent would be more atom-efficient than methanol production, but the feasibility of direct reduction of carbamate in aqueous solution needed to be evaluated.


Bob Jewell - Presenter - Evaluation of Pure Ettringite/MWCNT Array Layered Composite for Piezoelectric Effect - (co-authors Anne Oberlink and Ashley Morris): The overarching objective of this research is to functionalize calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cements for energy harvesting and as a smart-sensing construction material. The discovery and characterization of ettringite, the primary strength contributor in CSA cement, as a piezoelectric crystal phase will create new knowledge on energy harvesting from CSA cement materials. The data on material properties and piezoelectric potential of ettringite-rich cementitious structural elements will not only enable the functionalization of construction materials as energy harvesting components but also will lay a solid foundation for future piezoelectric cementitious design. This project was awarded a National Science Foundation Grant for $309,737; which was directly related to the results from the CAER Seed Research Grant.


Nick Holubowitch - Presenter - Scavenging Waste Heat with Carbon Nanotubes in Thermelectrochemical Cells - (co-authors Cameron Lippert, James Landon): The work investigated the conversion of waste heat, a ubiquitous form of currently untapped energy, to electricity, a usable, concentrated form, using thermoelectrochemical cells. The Carbon group provided low-cost spray coated carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes which were subjected to a variety of optimizations in our custom built device for thermal energy scavenging. We constructed a cell capable of delivering a mass activity of 290 W kg-1 CNTs by only using 0.08 mg cm-2 (<$0.01 per cell) of this normally cost-prohibitive material. The findings should be of broader interest to myriad energy storage and conversion technologies seeking to exploit the attractive properties of carbon nanotubes. The seed funding led to a full grant ($94,000) from the Kentucky Department for Energy Development and Independence.


Eduardo Santillan-Jimenez - Presenter - Carbon-supported Molybdenum Carbide Catalysts for Bio-oil Hydrodeoxygenation - (co-authors Robert Pace, Ashley Morris, John Craddock): Albeit carbide catalysts have been proposed as a replacement for the problematic and/or expensive formulations used to catalyze several reactions, bulk (unsupported) carbides display surface areas inadequately low for catalytic applications. In the work funded with this seed grant, researchers in the Biofuels & Environmental Catalysis group increased the surface area of molybdenum carbide catalysts through the use of carbon supports developed by researchers of the Carbon Materials group. The resulting carbon-supported carbide catalysts not only showed superior performance in a reaction modeling the upgrading of biomass-derived oils, but synthetic parameters were found to control the structure of these formulations, which provides a way to further improve – and understand – their performance. Notably, the results of this project have already been submitted for publication.


Yaying Ji - Presenter - Development of Bifunctional Catalysts for Reductive Depolymerization of Lignin into Value-Added Chemicals - (co-authors Robert Pace, Dali Qian): Lignin is a principal constituent of lignocellulosic biomass (15-30% by weight, 40% by energy), so it has potential to act as a feedstock for the renewable production of a wide variety of bulk and fine chemicals. Depolymerization of lignin to valuable chemicals is challenging due to its recalcitrance. Our goal is to develop a less expensive Ni-based catalytic approach for conversion of lignin into aromatic chemicals.


Robert Hodgen - Presenter - Construction and Demonstration of a Torrefaction Kiln for Bio-char Production - (co-author Darrell Taulbee): Torrefaction is process in which raw biomass is heated under relatively mild conditions in an autogenous atmosphere. Torrefied biomass formed into pellets or briquettes have numerous advantages relative to raw biomass including a higher heating value, higher energy density, and a greater resistance to water degradation as well as a significant advantage that bio-char agglomerates can be processed and co-fired in existing power plants without the need for specialized feed or pulverization equipment. This study, which focused on kiln construction followed by the production and evaluation of briquettes made with torrefied biomass, revealed that a relatively mild pyrolysis temperature of 200 oC appeared to be optimum in terms of producing the most suitable briquetter feedstock. Further, these mild conditions resulted in relatively little loss of volatile matter yet provided a substantial improvement in calorific value and improved resistance to water degradation.


Jesse Thompson - Presenter - CO2 Capture Solvent Purification with Adsorbant Bio-Char from Algae: Preparation, Characterization and Adsorption Studies - (coauthors Sarah Honchul, Robert Pace): The bio-char residue produced as a by-product from thermal treatments of algal biomass for biofuel production was evaluated, without any additional upgrading, for its ability to adsorb operational contaminant (amines and heavy metals) from carbon capture solvents. The bio-char from pyrolysis, hydrothermal liquefaction and torrefaction of algal biomass grown in bioreactors with carbon dioxide from a coal burning power plant showed comparable adsorption of the amine contaminants compared to a commercial activated carbon. Adsorption of heavy metals was comparably low with the bio-char evaluated. Additional upgrading with acid treatments, activation at higher temperatures, or alumina-modification may improve the metal adsorption of this bio-char.


Michael Wilson - Presenter - Upcycling of Brewery Byproducts Using Microalgae - (coauthors and pictured left is Thomas Grubbs and C. Cecil; Stephanie Kesner, not pictured): The CAER has a unique opportunity to collaborate on a sustainable project with two progressive Lexington organizations, West Sixth Brewing Company and FoodChain. Spent grains from the brewing process at West Sixth are currently combined with a protein source to feed tilapia grown by FoodChain. The water, containing organic nutrients excreted by the fish, is then circulated through an aquaponic system with the nutrients being used to grow traditional crops, such as lettuce, herbs, and microgreens. This seed grant proposal suggests that the CO2 from the brewing process could be used to grow protein rich algae, which would—in turn—replace the current protein supplement being incorporated into the spent grains to be fed to the tilapia, thereby effectively closing the system. Working with senior students from Chemical Engineering and Architecture/Sustainability, CAER staff evaluated the potential process and concluded that an algae system sized to utilize all of the CO2 emissions from the brewing process would take up half an acre and produce enough protenacious algae meal to scale up FoodChains operations by 100 times.

UK CAER Carbon Associate Director Quoted in Lane Report

clock January 9, 2015 14:11 by author Alice


The LANE REPORT, a publication that covers business and economic news from across Kentucky, recently focused on the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research's efforts in dealing with issues that affect the competitiveness of Kentucky's coal. Per the report ...

"Scientists at the UK Center for Applied Energy Research are exploring ways to improve the ecological impact of fuel coal and investigating whether it is feasible to turn it into a versatile, non-fuel raw material for industry. CAER’s research focuses include employing algae to gobble up carbon dioxide from power plants’ emissions, better managing waste coal ash, and transforming coal into high-strength, lightweight carbon fiber."

"The coal research complements a plethora of other energy studies CAER’s team of geologists, chemists and engineers of various disciplines are undertaking. They also are investigating biodiesel uses, advanced battery construction, renewable energy, and more."

"Explorations into remediation of coal-fired power plants emissions is CAER researchers’ top job, a mission shared with energy scientists the world over, according to Matt Weisenberger, the center’s associate director."

"The question is whether the various strategies CAER and other energy institutes are reviewing, is financially viable and scalable enough to counter criticisms of coal as a fuel source."

The complete Lane Report Article on UK CAER.


UK CAER Hosts Italian PhD Student

clock December 15, 2014 11:32 by author Alice

As part of a collaboration with Prof. Carlo Visconti and Prof. Luca Lietti from the University of Milan, Italy, UK-CAER’s CFC group, led by Dr. Burtron H. Davis, had the opportunity to host Ms. Michela Martinelli, a PhD graduate student, for several months.  During that time, Ms. Martinelli worked with UK-CAER research staff to investigate methods to improve low temperature water-gas shift catalysts for fuel cell applications.  She worked very hard, and one manuscript has already been accepted for publication in an excellent journal, while a second completed manuscript has been submitted as a book chapter.

During her stay at UK-CAER, Ms. Martinelli collaborated not only with our staff, but also with researchers at both Brookhaven National Laboratory, where she had the opportunity to visit and conduct experiments, and Argonne National Laboratory.  We are happy to report that Dr. Michela Martinelli successfully defended her PhD thesis in December of 2014.

UK CAER and KGS hold first EUOGS Conference

clock December 4, 2014 09:45 by author Alice

The Kentucky Geological Survey and Center for Applied Energy Research at the University of Kentucky teamed up to co-sponsor the first Eastern Unconventional Oil & Gas Symposium,  held at the Hilton in downtown Lexington, November 5-7.

Unconventional energy resource production refers to the use of non-traditional methods of oil and gas extraction or production from rocks not previously thought to have hydrocarbon potential. These include shales and low permeability sandstone. The boom in unconventional production has been driven in recent years by new technologies that can enhance oil and gas production from previously unrecoverable resources.

The conference was targeted for, but not limited to oil and gas producing areas in the Appalachian and Michigan basins, and addressed a number of upstream and downstream issues related to energy production, including:

  • Upstream Side: horizontal drilling, fracture stimulation, regulations, water issues, pipelines, induced seismicity, geology, and related topics.
  • Downstream Side: impacted by issues with regulated utilities, natural gas vehicles, sustainability, environmental impacts, and other focus areas.

There were well over 100 attendees from a half-dozen countries there to hear over 30 presentations on regulations, water treatment, geologic formations, and a variety of of new technologies and techniques. Keynote speakers included:

  • Dr. Len Peters, Secretary of the KY Energy Cabinet on Kentucky’s energy plan in a changing energy environment,
  • Duane Schrader of Louisville Gas and Electric, on Natural Gas generation from utilities’ persepctive,
  • Joe Morris, VP of Geology at EQT, on regional development,
  • Rich Haut of HARC, on gas flaring,
  • Mark Jergens of Midwest Energy Logistics, on gas and liquid markets.

Overall, the symposium was well-received, and interest in continuing the conference was high.

Distinguished “West Virginian Award” presented to Dr. Burtron H. Davis

clock November 17, 2014 15:05 by author Alice

Following Governor Tomblin’s 2014 Energy Summit, which took place at the Stonewall Resort on October 23-24, West Virginia’s Governor Earl Ray Tomblin presented Dr. Burtron H. Davis with the “Distinguished West Virginian Award.” The Governor applauded Dr. Davis while declaring that the award represents the highest honor that can be bestowed upon a person from West Virginia for outstanding achievement and meritorious service. Senator Joe Manchin was also present during the celebration as well as Jeff Herholdt, Director of the West Virginia Division of Energy.

Depicted from left to right:  

Governor Tomblin, Dr. Burt Davis, Senator Joe Manchin and Director Jeff Herholdt. 

The Potomac State College at West Virginia University newsletter called the "Catamount Spirit" recently ran an article ... "Alumnus Burtron Davis Named Distinghished West Virginian".

Online Text book Written by CAER's Graham, Jacobs and Davis

clock June 30, 2014 11:10 by author Alice
The online book ‘Practical Electron Microscopy and Database,’ a reference for TEM and SEM operators, engineers, technicians, managers, researchers and students uses TEM/EELS data and figures generated and published by Graham, Jacobs and Davis. For more information, check out the online book page.

Research by Fulbright Scholar Completed while at UK CAER Wins Major Award

clock June 4, 2014 13:46 by author Alice
Thani Jermwongratanachai, previously a graduate student at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, has won the best oral presentation award at the RGJ - Ph.D. Congress XIV held at the Jomtien Palm Beach Hotel and Resort in Pattaya, Thailand. Ph.D students present at the RGJ conference at the end of their educational program. The title of Thani's talk was “A Comparison between Pt and Ag as Metal Promoters for Co/Al2O3 Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalyst”.


Thani Jermwongratanachai, previously a graduate student at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, has won the best oral presentation award at the RGJ - Ph.D. Congress XIV held at the Jomtien Palm Beach Hotel and Resort in Pattaya, Thailand. Ph.D students present at the RGJ conference at the end of their educational program. The title of Thani's talk was “A Comparison between Pt and Ag as Metal Promoters for Co/Al2O3 Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalyst”.



Thani was part of the Royal Golden Jubilee (RGJ) program of Thailand project which aims to produce 5,000 Ph.D. graduates in as few as 15 years when it was realized in the last two decades that one of the serious causes for the social and economic weakness of Thailand was the severe shortage of highly qualified human resources especially in the field of science and technology. Because of its merit, the project was also proclaimed one of the programs to commemorate H.M. the King's Golden Jubilee year of reign.


The work that was presented was completed at CAER during the summer of 2013. His advisers were Boonyarach Kitiyanan (Chulalongkorn University), Gary Jacobs (UK-CAER), and Burtron H. Davis (UK-CAER). Top, as he was affectionately known at CAER, came to the Center as a Fulbright Scholar after receiving a grant in 2012. The grant application was written by his three advisors, with Dr. Jacobs and Prof. Davis serving as his hosts in the USA. During his stay, he made presentations at national and international meetings and was a co-author on 6 refereed publications.


His primary research explored the use of silver as a promoter in cobalt Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts to not only possibly replace expensive precious metal promoters (e.g., platinum), but to also improve the product selectivity away from undesirable light gas products. Much of his work involved the use of synchrotron radiation, and Top had the opportunity to accompany Dr. Jacobs on visits to the synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory, as well as to collaborate with researchers at Argonne National Laboratory.


In May of 2014, Dr. Jacobs received funding from the Royal Golden Jubilee program to visit Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand, and serve on Top’s graduate committee. On May 16th, Top successfully defended his thesis, entitled “Utilization of methane: methylation of benzene with methane, and gas-to-liquids (GTL) via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.” The same day, Dr. Jacobs gave a one hour seminar entitled “Applications of synchrotron methods in the characterization of catalysts for the production of alternative fuels.”


UK CAER's Uschi Graham Joins NAM Organizing Committee

clock June 4, 2014 11:32 by author Alice

Dr. Uschi Graham, UK CAER Research Scientist, has been asked to join the organizing committee of the 24th North American Catalysis Society.  The 24th NAM conference will be held in Pittsburg, PA from June 14-19, 2015 at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center. 

Burt Davis Receives 2014 NACS Award for Distinguished Work

clock June 4, 2014 11:01 by author Alice

Dr. Burtron Davis, UK CAER Clean Fuels and Chemicals Associate Director, is the has received the 2014 NACS Award for Distinguished Service in Advancement of Catalysis.

The following is taken from the NACS Press Release (  The Award is pre­sented every two years to rec­og­nize an indi­vid­ual who has advanced cat­alytic chem­istry or engi­neer­ing through both sig­nif­i­cant ser­vice to the catal­y­sis com­mu­nity and out­stand­ing tech­ni­cal accom­plish­ments. This award includes an hon­o­rar­ium ($5,000) and a plaque. It is awarded by the North Amer­i­can Catal­y­sis Soci­ety and spon­sored by Exxon­Mo­bil Research and Engi­neer­ing and Clari­ant and will be pre­sented dur­ing the 2015 NAM in Pittsburgh 

Dr. Davis is being rec­og­nized in par­tic­u­lar for his con­tri­bu­tion to indus­trial research prob­lems with a detailed under­stand­ing of cat­alytic trans­for­ma­tions. His work in iso­topic label­ing stud­ies has helped obtain in depth knowl­edge of reac­tion path­ways of indus­tri­ally rel­e­vant processes and prob­ing cat­alytic mech­a­nisms. Specif­i­cally, Dr. Davis has focused on Fischer-Tropsch reac­tion mech­a­nisms and cat­alytic trans­for­ma­tions using cobalt, iron and ruthenium-based cat­a­lysts research­ing fun­da­men­tal ques­tions with indus­try rel­e­vance. Dur­ing his five decade career, Dr. Davis has co-authored more than 500 peer reviewed pub­li­ca­tions and orga­nized numer­ous sym­posia in var­i­ous areas of catalysis that honored renowned petroleum chemists including Paul H. Emmett, W. Keith Hall, Robert Eischens and John Sinfelt among many others. 

In ser­vice to the catal­y­sis com­mu­nity, Dr. Davis has served the North Amer­i­can Catal­y­sis Soci­ety in var­i­ous capac­i­ties includ­ing orga­niz­ing the 12th NAM in Lex­ing­ton and serv­ing as the Hon­orary Chair of the 23rd NAM in Louisville. For the past three decades Dr. Davis has func­tioned as a his­to­rian of the NACS and the catal­y­sis com­mu­nity. His fore­sight, ded­i­ca­tion and efforts to archive and record the his­tory of the soci­ety and cat­alytic sci­ence has led to an unprece­dented NACS hosted col­lec­tion of more than 1300 videos of con­fer­ence pre­sen­ta­tions and one on one inter­views.  He has captured the voices, images and messages of many of the greats in catalysis including Professors Paul Emmett, Ed Teller, Geoff Wilkinson, Robert Burwell, Daniel Eley, Michel Boudart, Mark Dry, and Hermann Pines just to name but a few.  This col­lec­tion stands as a tes­ta­ment to the ded­i­ca­tion of Burt Davis to the preser­va­tion of the his­tory of catal­y­sis for gen­er­a­tions to come.

UK CAER Scientist Gives Plenary Lecture at International Nanotechnology Congress

clock May 12, 2014 15:53 by author Alice
Dr. Uschi Graham, Principal Research Scientist at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, recently attended the International Nanotechnology Congress, held April 23-36, 2014 in Antalya, Turkey. She presented one of the plenary lectures at the Congress that was entitled “In vivo processing of ceria nanoparticles: Impact on free radical scavenging activity and oxidative stress.” Ceria is an important industrial catalyst material used in fuel synthesis applications and is extensively studied in the Clean Fuels and Chemicals Group at the CAER.


The Nanotox2014 Congress continues the series of international conventions on nanotoxicology that so far has included meetings in Miami (2006), Zurich (2008), Edinburgh (2010) and Beijing (2012). The focus of these meetings is on outcomes of interactions between engineered nanomaterials and biological systems. The Congress in Antalya had participants from 42 countries representing Europe, Asia, Australia, South America and Africa.


Topics in Catalysis Issue Dedicated to Burt Davis Now Published

clock March 12, 2014 10:10 by author Alice
A special issue of the journal, Topics in Catalysis, has been published by Springer publisher. The issue includes a collection of papers authored by many of the speakers who attended a three-day awards symposium to honor Burtron H. Davis at the American Chemical Society (ACS) Spring National Meeting in New Orleans on April 8-10, 2013. Additionally, other authors who were unable to attend, but wanted to make a contribution are included.


"The presentations reflected an array of catalytic reactions for a wide range of energy applications ranging from traditional reactions in petroleum refining to alternative fuels research (including Fischer–Tropsch synthesis, methanol synthesis, hydrogen production and storage, and the upgrading of chemicals derived from biorenewable resources) to catalytic applications in rocket propulsion. The scope of the presentations and discussions reflects the far-reaching impact that Burt Davis has had on the catalysis and fuels research community".


Guest editors, Uschi Graham and Gary Jacobs, two scientists that work with Dr. Davis from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research Clean Fuels & Chemicals research group, wrote the foreword for this special issue.


Dr. Davis, Associate Director of the CFC group at the UK CAER, is the recipient of the prestigious 2013 American Chemical Society’s Distinguished Researcher Award in Petroleum Chemistry.


Catalyis Expert Meets Another Milestone and is Honored

clock November 7, 2013 12:03 by author Marybeth McAlister



Associate Director Burt Davis is being honored by a Special Issue of Topics in Catalysis on “Catalysis for Energy Applications”.  The guest editors are CAER researchers Uschi Graham and Gary Jacobs, and the Chief Editors are Professor Gabor Somorjai (University of California, Berkeley, USA) and Professor Hans-Joachim Freund (Fritz Haber Institut der Max Planck, Gessellschaft, Germany).  The 39 papers, including 10 co-authored by at least one group member from CAER,  have been accepted and are being prepared by Springer Publishing for early 2014 publication. The prolific group also has two most-cited articles in Journal of Catalysis and Applied Catalysis A: General over the last five year period. 

Burt Davis

Founders and Innovators of Catalysis Science - Energeia Vol 24 - 2013

clock October 22, 2013 11:10 by author Alice

The next issue of the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research's newsletter, Energeia, (vol 24, issue 3, 2013) is now available.  Articles include: 

  • The Founders and Innovators of Catalysis Science, Part 2 by Dr Burt Davis
  • Why EPSCoR Matters by Jeff Mossey
  • News items including:
  • Record Breaking Catalysis Conference Organized by CAER>
  • Institute for Briquetting and Agglomeration 33rd Biennial Technical Conference
  • CAER selected for National Energy Technology Laboratory $3 million project

Real Time May-June 2013 Newsletter

clock July 25, 2013 11:18 by author Alice

Real Time is now available!

May-June 2013 Newsletter from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research

Feature: Record Breaking North American Catalysis Society Conference co-organized by UK CAER Researchers. Burt Davis receives a NACS award.

Highlights: CAER's renewable energy laboratory building has saved approximately $147,000 per year in utility savings; CRN and CEATI have annual meeting at UK CAER; Russell Cave students enjoy tour at UK CAER; Researches reach out during recent STEM Girl's day at EKU; Steven Lipka is early grantee of announced UK-GE master agreement; UK CAER presents award to John Moffett for CAER Distinguished Service Award; and much more!

Energeia 2013 Issue 24-2 now Published

clock July 17, 2013 16:12 by author Alice

Energeia 2013 Issue 24-2 includes:

  • The Founders and Innovators of Catalysis Science - Paul Emmett, Edward Teller, Geoffrey Wilkinson, Edith Marie Flanigen, Gabor Somorjai, Gehard Ertl, Keith Hall, Robert Grubbs by Burt Davis
  • WOCA 2013
  • CAER Expands Briquetting and Binder Development
  • Commentary - Economic Development in Eastern Kentucky Requires Integration of Energy Resources by Roger Ford
  • CAER Spring Filled with Student Tours