UK CAER Current News

The Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) is one of the University of Kentucky's multidisciplinary research centers. Its energy research provides a focal point for environmental, renewable and fossil fuels research in Kentucky.

Several Job Positions Available at UK CAER

clock September 23, 2013 11:53 by author Alice

The University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research has posted 8 job descriptions that are now available.  Please review the Power Generation page for details.

  • CO2 Capture Process Modeling Post Doctoral Researcher
  • CO2 Capture Process Data Analysis Post Doctoral Researcher
  • Environmental Gas Sample Collection Technologist
  • Amine Aerosol Emissions from CO2 Post Doctoral Researcher
  • Solvent Degradation and Emissions Post Doctoral Researcher
  • Zeolite / Zeolite Membrane Development / Liquid Separation Post Doctoral Researcher
  • Electrochemical Development for Thermal Energy Generation Post Doctoral Researcher
  • Catalysis / Develop Catalysts to Enhance CO2 Capture Processes Post Doctoral Researcher


CAER Researcher Seeks Safer Batteries for Underground Mine Use

clock September 9, 2013 11:30 by author Marybeth McAlister

 

Dr. Steve Lipka, CAER Associate Director for Electrochemical Power Sources, has been awarded a 2 year, $389,000 grant from The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).  The title of the project is “Evaluating the Inherent Safety of Lithium-ion Batteries in Portable Electronics Used in Underground Mine Environments.”

 This project will help to understand the safety of Li-ion battery chemistries used in portable electronic devices such as hand-held gas detectors, cap lamps, hand tools, communications devices, and tracking devices and their potential risk as an ignition source in an underground mine where there is a mixture of methane and air.  In a catastrophic event, the battery can sustain mechanical damage, resulting in reactions between active battery materials and the highly volatile and flammable organic electrolyte.  These reactions can result in rising cell temperatures which accelerate further chemical reactions in the battery causing heat and gas generation. The project will evaluate the ignition potential of various Li-ion battery chemistries in both cylindrical and prismatic cell formats in a simulated underground mine environment under mechanical damage. 

Lipka’s group will recommend safer lithium-ion battery chemistries and use in portable devices. The researchers will also develop strategies to stop or reduce potential ignition for lithium-ion batteries used in underground mines.

Professor Thomas Novak of UK’s Department of Mining Engineering will serve as a project consultant.